Our Services

  • icon Business Architecture
  • icon Data Architecture
  • icon Practice Building
  • icon Digital Disruption Architecture

No business can hope to thrive unless it has a clear understanding of its own business model. In the full sense, this implies a current, accurate and well-accepted definition of a number of factors, including such fundamentals as:

  • The reason for the business to exist;
  • The value propositions they offer, and the customer segments they offer them to;
  • Precisely why the customers buy from them;
  • A clear vision of the near and mid-term future shape of the business;
  • The competitive and financial landscape in which the business operates.
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Enterprise-level Data Architecture provides the basis for strong and effective control of data as it passes through an organization. It has both upward-facing (towards the business use of information and downward-facing (toward the storage and control of data in databases) functions, allowing it to bridge between the intended and actual nature of the data.

The most important data elements should have their life-cycles well understood and documented, and effective data governance should be put in place to ensure that data quality is consistently maintained. Data Architecture provides the underpinnings to this understanding and control, defining the authoritative nature of each data element, its path through the organisation, and the responsibilities for ensuring its quality.

At Doriq, we have many years experience in defining and implementing data architecture in large, complex organisations, and have the benefit of global thought leadership in several areas of data management. Our books have been cited by professional bodies as a major influence on the development of effective practices in this area over the last twenty years.

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 Successful architectural practices are founded on:

  • The willingness of key stakeholders (e.g. senior management) to support and fund the architectural practice;
  • A broader acceptance in the stakeholder community that the architectural approach is valid, and a willingness to engage with the architecture function operationally;
  • The existence of a well-trained workforce to fill the architectural roles;
  • A formal framework within which architecture will be built and maintained. This will ensure that:
    1. Architectural practices are applied consistently;
    2. Architectural knowledge is gathered, managed, controlled and re-used effectively;
    3. Results of the architectural approach can be observed, and therefore measured.
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There is no question that today’s business environment faces unprecedented challenges. Forces like globalization, changing demographics, harsh economic environment and rapidly changing technology are creating challenges and conditions never experienced before. In this new world, volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity seem to be pervasive. The only certainty seems to be that these so-called VUCA factors are set to drive  unstoppable and accelerating pace of technological advance.

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